ANKH Key Of Life Ancient Egyptian Amulet Pendant Necklace

$46.95

In honor of my North African Berber (U5b1b1) genetic motherline connection - The ancient ancestral population of the caucasoid Berber Tribe of North Africa has been demonstrated by genetic scientists to be ancestral to peoples with genetic roots in both Old World Scandinavia and among the Ancient Egyptian ruling class.

The Ankh, also known as the key of life, the key of the Nile or crux ansata, was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character that read "eternal life", a triliteral sign for the consonants ʻ-n-ḫ. Egyptian gods are often portrayed carrying it by its loop, or bearing one in each hand, arms crossed over their chest.

The origin of the symbol remains a mystery to Egyptologists, and no single hypothesis has been widely accepted. One of the earliest suggestions is that of Thomas Inman, first published in 1869: It is by Egyptologists called the symbol of life. It is also called the 'handled cross,' or crux ansata. It represents the male triad and the female unit, under a decent form.

During the reign of Hatshepsut (1508–1458 BC), E. A. Wallis Budge from Royal Ontario Museum postulated that the symbol originated as the belt-buckle of the mother goddess Isis, an idea joined by Wolfhart Westendorf with the notion that both the ankh and the knot of Isis were used in many ceremonies.

The ankh appears frequently in Egyptian tomb paintings and other art, often at the fingertips of a god or goddess in images that represent the deities of the afterlife conferring the gift of life on the dead person's mummy; this is thought to symbolize the act of conception. Additionally, an ankh was often carried by Egyptians as an amulet, either alone, or in connection with two other hieroglyphs that mean "strength" and "health". Mirrors of beaten metal were also often made in the shape of an ankh, either for decorative reasons or to symbolize a perceived view into another world.

This lovely antiqued brass plated (over a lead and nickel free base metal) ANKH amulet talisman features a blue rhinestone on the bail and on the breastplate of the goddess. The pendant measures approximately 45 x 72 mm, and comes on your choice of a 20", 24" or 28" antiqued bronze chain fitted with lobster claw clasp.

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Description

In honor of my North African Berber (U5b1b1) genetic motherline connection - The ancient ancestral population of the caucasoid Berber Tribe of North Africa has been demonstrated by genetic scientists to be ancestral to peoples with genetic roots in both Old World Scandinavia and among the Ancient Egyptian ruling class.

The Ankh, also known as the key of life, the key of the Nile or crux ansata, was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character that read "eternal life", a triliteral sign for the consonants ʻ-n-ḫ. Egyptian gods are often portrayed carrying it by its loop, or bearing one in each hand, arms crossed over their chest.

The origin of the symbol remains a mystery to Egyptologists, and no single hypothesis has been widely accepted. One of the earliest suggestions is that of Thomas Inman, first published in 1869: It is by Egyptologists called the symbol of life. It is also called the 'handled cross,' or crux ansata. It represents the male triad and the female unit, under a decent form.

During the reign of Hatshepsut (1508–1458 BC), E. A. Wallis Budge from Royal Ontario Museum postulated that the symbol originated as the belt-buckle of the mother goddess Isis, an idea joined by Wolfhart Westendorf with the notion that both the ankh and the knot of Isis were used in many ceremonies.

The ankh appears frequently in Egyptian tomb paintings and other art, often at the fingertips of a god or goddess in images that represent the deities of the afterlife conferring the gift of life on the dead person's mummy; this is thought to symbolize the act of conception. Additionally, an ankh was often carried by Egyptians as an amulet, either alone, or in connection with two other hieroglyphs that mean "strength" and "health". Mirrors of beaten metal were also often made in the shape of an ankh, either for decorative reasons or to symbolize a perceived view into another world.

This lovely antiqued brass plated (over a lead and nickel free base metal) ANKH amulet talisman features a blue rhinestone on the bail and on the breastplate of the goddess. The pendant measures approximately 45 x 72 mm, and comes on your choice of a 20", 24" or 28" antiqued bronze chain fitted with lobster claw clasp.

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Weight: 0.25 LBS
Shipping: Calculated at Checkout