The Goddess Stirnmina

The Goddess Stirnmina

Early this morning, I dreamt of an Old European Germanic goddess of my ancestors. Pronounced 'stirn-meena' in the dream, I was being queried by my people regarding her. Of her exactly, it was not written.

The first English Germanic letter of her name is 'S'. Corresponding to the rune sowilo, 's' is associated with light and the feminine sun (Old Norwegian rune poem), shielding protection and shining rays (Old Icelandic rune poem) and joy (Anglo-Saxon rune poem).

The letters T-I-R (Tyr) associate with balance, justice, well-being, honor, higher rationality, right decision-making, sound judgement, order, victory and the force of connection (commonly called faith). Tir is likened to Latin Mars and Zeus, and also to Greek Zeus.

Together, the first four English Germanic letters of her name comprise the English word 'stir'. She arouses the spirit weaving through her people. She awakens others to connection.

The part of her name, German 'stirn', means 'forehead' in English. Streaming together through the forehead, connections to others are perceived, bondage to time-bound consciousness is overcome, identity strengthens, psychic and mental abilities are enhanced, and clear knowledge is received. It is the place of commanding, of summoning.

The first syllable ends with the rune naudiz, where consciousness makes distinctions between what is needed and what is not. Resistance and negative orlog are overcome. Strength, creativity and the ability to influence wyrd are increased.

The second syllable of her name, 'Mina' means precious stone (like the mystery of the unhewn dolmen) and love. It is also an endearing family form of the name Wilhelmina, a combination of will, desire plus helmet, protection. Made famous as the heroine of Bram Stoker's Dracula, the name Mina links itself through this classic story also to the I2 Dragon Clan of my ancestral fathers.

Stirnmina may be the Old European Germanic form of she who became known as Sulis-Minerva in Celto-Romanic Britain.