DRAGON HEART Double Faced Amulet Pendant Necklace

$39.95

European dragons are legendary creatures in folklore and mythology among the overlapping cultures of Europe whose legends are believed to have started around 3000 B.C.E.

In Western folklore, dragons are usually portrayed as evil, with the exceptions mainly in Welsh folklore and modern fiction. This is in contrast to Asian dragons, who are traditionally depicted as more benevolent creatures. Dragon's blood often has magical properties: for example in the opera Siegfried it let Siegfried understand the language of the Forest Bird. The typical dragon protects a cavern or castle filled with gold and treasure and is often associated with a great hero who tries to slay it. Though a winged creature, the dragon is generally to be found in its underground lair, a cave that identifies it as an ancient creature of earth. Possibly, the dragons of European and Mid Eastern mythology stem from the cult of snakes found in religions throughout the world.

The most famous dragons in Norse and Germanic mythology are:

Níðhöggr who gnaws at the roots of Yggdrasil, the World tree;

Jörmungandr, Miðgarðsormurinn (Icelandic), Midgårdsormen (Swedish and Danish),
Midgardsormen (Norwegian), the giant sea serpent which surrounds Miðgarð, the world of mortal men;

Fafnir, which had turned into a dragon because of his greed, and was killed by Sigurd;

Lindworms, monstrous serpents of Germanic myth and lore, often interchangeable with dragons;

Landvættur, the benevolent dragon whom King Harald's servant met in Vopnafjörður according to Heimskringla, and also depicted on the Icelandic Coat of Arms;

The dragon encountered by Beowulf.

Though Somerset (England) has traditionally had a red dragon as an emblem, the red dragon is more commonly associated with Wales, as its national flag features a red dragon (Y Ddraig Goch). This may originate in Arthurian Legend where Myrddin, employed by Gwrtheyrn, had a vision of the red dragon (representing the Britons) and the white dragon (representing the invading Saxons) fighting beneath Dinas Emrys. This particular legend also features in the Mabinogion in the story of Lludd and Llefelys. The legendary house of Pendragon and Celtic Britain in general have become associated with the Welsh dragon. Celtic tradition also informs us that dual Dragon ley lines apex at the Glastonbury Tor, converging into an awesomely primeval mix of transformative occult power. At the Tor is the entrance to the Celtic Otherworld known as Annwn.

English "dragon" derives (via Middle English, Old French, and Latin) from Greek dracon, "serpent, dragon"; the Greek word derives from Indo-European *derk-, "to see", and may originally have meant something like "monster with the evil eye." Notwithstanding their folkloric associations, there is no etymological connection between dragons and the ghoulish figures known as draugar in Old Norse, who haunt rich burial mounds.

Dragons may also provide powerful protection from the evil eye, returning to sender baneful energy with potent primeval force.

Conjure ancient Dragon energies and elicit their guidance and protection using this lovely antiqued brass plated (over a lead and nickel free base metal) double faced amulet talisman featuring a two-faced design with a blood red rhinestone, measuring 35 x 30 mm, and hung on a 20" bronze plated chain fitted with a lobster claw clasp.

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European dragons are legendary creatures in folklore and mythology among the overlapping cultures of Europe whose legends are believed to have started around 3000 B.C.E.

In Western folklore, dragons are usually portrayed as evil, with the exceptions mainly in Welsh folklore and modern fiction. This is in contrast to Asian dragons, who are traditionally depicted as more benevolent creatures. Dragon's blood often has magical properties: for example in the opera Siegfried it let Siegfried understand the language of the Forest Bird. The typical dragon protects a cavern or castle filled with gold and treasure and is often associated with a great hero who tries to slay it. Though a winged creature, the dragon is generally to be found in its underground lair, a cave that identifies it as an ancient creature of earth. Possibly, the dragons of European and Mid Eastern mythology stem from the cult of snakes found in religions throughout the world.

The most famous dragons in Norse and Germanic mythology are:

Níðhöggr who gnaws at the roots of Yggdrasil, the World tree;

Jörmungandr, Miðgarðsormurinn (Icelandic), Midgårdsormen (Swedish and Danish),
Midgardsormen (Norwegian), the giant sea serpent which surrounds Miðgarð, the world of mortal men;

Fafnir, which had turned into a dragon because of his greed, and was killed by Sigurd;

Lindworms, monstrous serpents of Germanic myth and lore, often interchangeable with dragons;

Landvættur, the benevolent dragon whom King Harald's servant met in Vopnafjörður according to Heimskringla, and also depicted on the Icelandic Coat of Arms;

The dragon encountered by Beowulf.

Though Somerset (England) has traditionally had a red dragon as an emblem, the red dragon is more commonly associated with Wales, as its national flag features a red dragon (Y Ddraig Goch). This may originate in Arthurian Legend where Myrddin, employed by Gwrtheyrn, had a vision of the red dragon (representing the Britons) and the white dragon (representing the invading Saxons) fighting beneath Dinas Emrys. This particular legend also features in the Mabinogion in the story of Lludd and Llefelys. The legendary house of Pendragon and Celtic Britain in general have become associated with the Welsh dragon. Celtic tradition also informs us that dual Dragon ley lines apex at the Glastonbury Tor, converging into an awesomely primeval mix of transformative occult power. At the Tor is the entrance to the Celtic Otherworld known as Annwn.

English "dragon" derives (via Middle English, Old French, and Latin) from Greek dracon, "serpent, dragon"; the Greek word derives from Indo-European *derk-, "to see", and may originally have meant something like "monster with the evil eye." Notwithstanding their folkloric associations, there is no etymological connection between dragons and the ghoulish figures known as draugar in Old Norse, who haunt rich burial mounds.

Dragons may also provide powerful protection from the evil eye, returning to sender baneful energy with potent primeval force.

Conjure ancient Dragon energies and elicit their guidance and protection using this lovely antiqued brass plated (over a lead and nickel free base metal) double faced amulet talisman featuring a two-faced design with a blood red rhinestone, measuring 35 x 30 mm, and hung on a 20" bronze plated chain fitted with a lobster claw clasp.

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Weight: 0.50 LBS
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